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Finding a Maid in Bali

Most expats living in Bali tend to have at least one staff member under their employment. It is sometimes a controversial topic, as in western countries it is very rare to have a maid in your home, and some feel it is inappropriate to keep a servant. That is a very skewed way of looking at the situation though.

For an expat living in Bali a maid’s service can be invaluable, and it also provides a job to a local who may otherwise not have any work. As long as you treat your staff with the respect that any human being deserves, there should be no reason for anyone to think any less of you for employing a maid.

A maid’s salary can vary depending on the situation of her working condition and her skills. A maid who speaks English at a level of fluency to be able to understand a person brand new to Bali is obviously going to cost a bit more. Many locals who employ maids (pembantu in Bahasa Indonesia) usually opt for a live-in maid, who will live in a small room of their house. This concept usually seems a little strange to most foreigners, having an extra person around the house all the time, but it is pretty standard. If you choose to have a live-in maid, her monthly salary will be much lower because you will be providing her accommodation and you will also be expected to provide all of her meals and other needs like soap and other hygiene products. An average salary for a live-in maid could be anywhere from rp 500,000 to rp 1,000,000, with most locals employing maids for around rp 500,000 and many expats going up to 1,000,000 per month and sometimes even more.

For those that don’t feel comfortable with having an extra person living in their house all the time, having a maid that comes in the morning and leaves at night is also a popular option, although is a bit more expensive as she will be responsible for paying for her own accommodation and food while not working for you. This will cost you approximately rp 600,000 to rp 1,000,000 per month, with the former being on more of a half-day basis and the latter on a full time scale.

Maid salaries can be controversial, but as long as both you and she are happy with the price agreed upon then all should be alright. A maid just like any other employee will over time expect saome raises for cost of living and also for their hard work. If you start out paying over the going rate, you might be confused later down the line about how to handle a raise for her.

As far finding a maid to look after your house, the person renting you your house will probably be able to recommend someone to you, although he may have vested interest as it is very possible it will be a member of his family. This will cause some tension later on down the road if there is a problem and you need to let your maid go. Another popular option is to find someone from the area that you live in, which will not only help to give you a bit of respect in your community for employing a member of the village, but she will also know more of the goings on in your area and will be more capable of helping out with certain things. The one thing to remember is to treat your maid well and with respect, and if you find one that you really like, don’t let her go because a good, reliable and hard-working maid is worth her weight in gold in Bali.

There are some services out there that will help to find maids for people that are in need of one and don’t have any leads on where to look. Many of these places will have maids that are already trained and usually have skills in English to help to make things easier. Some places like that are listed below.

 

7 Responses to Finding a Maid in Bali

  1. Thanks for the info. However, you don’t state if the salary you show in your posting is weekly or monthly.

    It would be good to know that because as it is I still have no idea of wage rates.

    Thanks for all the other info as it was really useful.

    Lance

    • Hi Lance, sorry if the information isn’t clear, I’m going to go in and edit it now. Wages in Indonesia are almost always paid on a monthly basis, so all prices stated in the article would be monthly wages.

  2. Hi,

    I found your article very informative – however, I am urgently needing a live-in (preferably male)
    pembantu – starting first week in July …. if suitable and happy to stay, then continuous permanent employment is available. We are particular busy in July through until September and
    would very much appreciate any interview opportunity immediately, so that we can solve this
    problem. A lot of our guests are disabled or are recovering from surgeries or illness and so a
    male person to occasionally help with moving, lifting etc would be an advantage. Also, we already
    employ 2 Javanese tukang who are permanently with us and also 2 male Balinese tukang pembantu who assist with the building work. We would prefer a Balinese male (not from our local
    area), or any other islander who is not needing to return home for Idul Fitri in August. This is
    when we are very busy. Please check our web site for more information. We will pay well, in
    accordance with productivity and trustworthyness – the person will be provided with 3 meals
    per day as well as morning and afternoon tea. Some previous hospitality training would be a
    huge advantage. Hope you can help us. Regards, G.Krakouer

  3. Yes a good maid is extremely hard to come by so if you find a good one…don’t let he or she go….but remember good while you are present does not mean good while you are away. I have been in Bali more than 20 years and I leave frequently to USA. When gone usually they let the house go unatteded and your animals will eat late if at all.
    It is almost gaurenteed that if you are not there…the quality of work will drop radically…just how it is and pretty much will always be…so just be aware of that fact.

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